LITERARY ATTRACTIONS IN DUBLIN

Dublin is renowned for its links to the literary world. Authors such as Bram Stoker, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce and Roddy Doyle all originate from here. Brooks Hotel is dedicated to promoting the arts and is close to many of Dublin's most notable literary attractions. 

  

Literary Attractions in Dublin

Chester Beatty Library
 
 The Chester Beatty Library
The Chester Beatty Library is located just a 7 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route by clicking HERE. It is free to visit and features Manuscripts, miniature paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and decorative arts.
Dublin Writers Museum  The Dublin Writers Museum
The Dublin Writers Museum is located about a 20 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route by clicking HERE. This museum is a celebration of literature in Dublin. The museum hosts exhibitions, readings and has a children's literature room. 
Book of Kells  The Book of Kells

The Book of Kells is located in Trinity College, just a 6 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route  by clicking HERE. The book of Kells is an ancient manuscript created by monks in the around the year 800. The book takes its name from the Abbey of Kells. 

 
 
                                       
Brooks Book of the Month
September 2018

Solar Bones

By Mike McCormack

Summary:  

Mike McCormack's Solar Bones announces the return of an Irish author who has been too-long neglected. His experimental story, set against the backdrop of the looming financial crisis, is a haunting meditation on family and duty. The fractured narrative and striking dialogue are reminiscent of the work of Eimear McBride and Kevin Barry, while his descriptions of rural isolation, personal displacement and rising paranoia perfectly evoke the shock of Ireland's economic fall. Despite the novel’s challenging style and subject, McCormack’s story is both full of wit and extremely engaging. McCormack is a uniquely talented author, with a voice that is entirely his own. Solar Bones proves to be a complex yet absorbing examination of the post-Celtic Tiger period. 

Winner of the International Dublin Literary Award