LITERARY ATTRACTIONS IN DUBLIN

Dublin is renowned for its links to the literary world. Authors such as Bram Stoker, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce and Roddy Doyle all originate from here. Brooks Hotel is dedicated to promoting the arts and is close to many of Dublin's most notable literary attractions. 

 

 

Literary Attractions in Dublin

Chester Beatty Library
 
 The Chester Beatty Library
The Chester Beatty Library is located just a 7 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route by clicking HERE. It is free to visit and features Manuscripts, miniature paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and decorative arts.
Dublin Writers Museum  The Dublin Writers Museum
The Dublin Writers Museum is located about a 20 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route by clicking HERE. This museum is a celebration of literature in Dublin. The museum hosts exhibitions, readings and has a children's literature room. 
Book of Kells  The Book of Kells

The Book of Kells is located in Trinity College, just a 6 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route  by clicking HERE. The book of Kells is an ancient manuscript created by monks in the around the year 800. The book takes its name from the Abbey of Kells. 

 
 
                                         

Brooks Book of the Month - November 2017


The Heart's Invisible Furies - John Boyne

 

"Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead. 

At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from and over his many years will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country, and much more.”


Boyne’s enraged vision is his great strength in The Heart’s Invisible Furies. The appalling comedy of Cyril’s childhood and youth, the vigour, the mess, the stir and life and horror of it all form the heart of a substantial achievement.’

The Guardian