Literary Attractions in Dublin

Dublin is renowned for its links to the literary world. Authors such as Bram Stoker, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce and Roddy Doyle all originate from here. Brooks Hotel is dedicated to promoting the arts and is close to many of Dublin's most notable literary attractions.

 

 

 

 

Literary Attractions in Dublin

  

The Cheaster Beatty Library: The Chester Beatty Library is located just a 7 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route by clicking HERE. It is free to visit and features Manuscripts, miniature paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and decorative arts.

 

The Dublin Writers Museum: The Dublin Writers Museum is located about a 20 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route by clicking HERE. This museum is a celebration of literature in Dublin. The museum hosts exhibitions, readings and has a children's literature room.

 

The Book of Kells: The Book of Kells is located in Trinity College, just a 6 minute walk from Brooks Hotel. You can view the route  by clicking HERE. The book of Kells is an ancient manuscript created by monks in the around the year 800. The book takes its name from the Abbey of Kells.

 

MoLI – a museum of literature for the world’s greatest storytellers: MoLI is located in the historic UCD Newman House on St Stephen’s Green, only a 10-minute walk away from Brooks Hotel. Once there experience immersive exhibitions, view treasures from the National Library of Ireland, or relax amid the birdsong in their tranquil gardens and café.

 

 

Brooks’ Book of the Month

November 2021

 

Snowflake

By Louise Nealon

 

An exquisitely talented young Irish writer makes her literary debut with this powerful and haunting novel—a tale of love and family, depression and joy, and coming of age in the twenty-first century that is a blend of Sally Rooney and Colm Tóibín.

 

Eighteen-year-old Debbie was raised on her family’s rural dairy farm, forty minutes and a world away from Dublin. She lives with her mother, Maeve, a skittish woman who takes to her bed for days on end, claims not to know who Debbie’s father is, and believes her dreams are prophecies. Rounding out their small family is Maeve’s brother Billy, who lives in a caravan behind their house, drinks too much, and likes to impersonate famous dead writers online. Though they may have their quirks, the Whites’ fierce love for one another is never in doubt.

But Debbie’s life is changing. Earning a place at Trinity College Dublin, she commutes to her classes a few days a week. Outside the sheltered bubble of her childhood for the first time, Debbie finds herself both overwhelmed and disappointed by her fellow students and the pace and anonymity of city life. While the familiarity of the farm offers comfort, Debbie still finds herself pulling away from it. Yet just as she begins to ponder the possibilities the future holds, a resurgence of strange dreams raises her fears that she may share Maeve’s fate. Then a tragic accident upends the family’s equilibrium, and Debbie discovers her next steps may no longer be hers to choose.


Gorgeous and beautifully wrought, Snowflake is an affecting coming-of-age story about a young woman learning to navigate a world that constantly challenges her sense of self.